Why no East African Pidgin?

<!–[if !mso]> st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } <![endif]–> So, Onyinye is another banging P-Square song ain’t it? Even the fake Rick Ross doesn’t manage to ruin it!

Anyway, if you listen to Afro Beats or hang around West Africans from Ghana, Nigeria, etc., you will be familiar with Pidgin English. As I understand it, pidgin it’s a kind of patois, sort of a broken English, or better still, Africanised English.

How come we don’t really have Pidgin English in East Africa? I mean, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana, etc were all lumbered with the same burden of British colonialism. And part of that experience has involved taking on the English language. But for some reason, unless I’m missing something, we didn’t develop a Pidgin English.
There must be a logical reason for this. But I just can’t think of it. Wetin Dey?

New Mix – African Riddimz!

Naija music has been blowing up for a little while now. Whatever they are putting in the water in Nigeria is resulting in a constant stream of excellent tunes from the likes of D’Banj, Flavour N’abania and of course P Square. All of these are featured in this mix, along with one or two offerings from Ugandan, Ghanaian and Congolese artists. Enjoy!

Happy New Year Nigeria! – From GEJ & the IMF

See Original source

“When President Goodluck Jonathan was campaigning for votes and after he won election and was sworn-in on May 29, he promised Nigerians “Fresh Air” and also an inclusive government. He assured the citizenry that his administration was going to be a listening one.

With these promises, many thought that everything about his government was going to be democratically debated and majority voice respected.

Less than a year after, the democratic promises of the President are been put to play. The issue of subsidy removal is now putting to test the President’s pledge to be transparent. It initially started as a rumour and then it officially came out that the government is going to remove fuel subsidy.

According to the executive arm of the government, subsidy on petroleum must be removed because the ordinary masses are not benefitting and the money spent on subsidy is been corned by some “Cartel”.

Government says it spends an annual estimate of N1.3 trillion on subsidy and that it cannot continue to sustain that.

The House of Representatives has categorically voiced their objection to the planned subsidy removal, while the labour union also threatened to make the government ungovernable if it insists on removing the subsidy.

Last week, at the town hall meeting convened by the Newspaper Proprietors Association of Nigeria (NPAN) in Lagos, Nigerian masses expressed their objection to the proposed subsidy removal from fuel.

As government is insisting on subsidy removal, many people are asking who are doing pushing the President to go against the will of the people.

And as if to answer the question, as the debate on the subsidy gets heated, the Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Christine Lagarde came visiting.

The meeting was not just coincidental. Analysts believe it was predetermined. The IMF has been canvassing for the removal of subsidy among African countries.

For instance, the IMF has urged countries across West and Central Africa to cut fuel subsidies, which they say are not effective in directly aiding the poor, but do promote corruption and smuggling.

This pronouncement has seen governments in Nigeria, Guinea, Cameroon, Chad and Ghana moving to cut state subsidies on fuel.

Yesterday, Ghana cut subsidy and it was learnt that the development was due to pressure from the IMF to do so because of rise in the price of crude.

The Chief Executive Officer of Ghana’s National Petroleum Authority (NPA), Alex Mould said the cumulative effect of the rise in crude oil prices this year and the about 5.7 percent depreciation of the cedi meant a 25 percent increase in cedi terms in the cost of procuring crude oil and petroleum products since January.

The price change will see the cost of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) increase by 30 percent while petrol and diesel will go up 15 percent at pumps in Ghana.

Mould said Ghana has spent about 450 million cedis on fuel subsidies in 2011.

Ghana’s Minister for Finance Kwabena Duffour said the removal of subsidies would have a positive impact on Ghana’s economy.

Duffour said: “Subsidising fuel is not sustainable. It is the right thing to do so we can sustain our fiscal consolidation.”

This is the same music that the protagonists of subsidy removal in Nigeria, like the Coordinating Minister of Economy and Minister of Finance, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala; the Minister of Petroleum, Diezani Alison-Madueke and the Governor of Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), Sanusi Lamido Sanusi are singing.

While Sanusi insisted that the economy would breakdown if the subsidy is not removed, Ngozi said Nigerians would be better off without subsidy.

Ghana’s subsidy removal yesterday confirmed people’s speculations that Western powers are behind the move to stop subsidy. Development in Ghana has also gone to confirm that the Nigerian government would boycott the public outcry on subsidy removal and go ahead to remove.

There is no provision for subsidy in the 2012 budget proposal submitted by President Goodluck Jonathan.

The Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) has said that from next year they would not pay for subsidy because there is no provision for it in the budget.

The development also negates the IMF’s saying that it does not tailor policies for any country to follow, but only provide technical supports.

But during the visit of Lagarde to Nigeria, she said, “I came here primarily to listen to our African members, and to find out how we can better tailor support to countries in this region in the current difficult global environment.”

Nigeria is indeed in serious economic problem. For instance, the value of the currency has been devaluing against major foreign currencies. The official value of naira against dollar is currently 156 to a dollar and at the Bureau De Change, it goes for 165 against the dollar.

The governor of central bank, Sanusi sometime this year faulted the IMF for suggesting that the value of the naira be devalued to protect further depreciation of the foreign reserves.

However, the governor bowed to pressure and got the naira devalued. It is the same pressure from the Western powers that is pushing the government to remove fuel subsidy.

In Nigeria, removal of subsidy would necessarily lead to hike in fuel pump and such hike would trigger increment in the price of other commodities and services.

It is already been speculated that by next year, when subsidy might have been removed, Nigerians would have to pay as high as N140 per litre of petrol. The price is currently N65 per litre.

What this means is that Nigerians should gird up for tough times next year. This is because any increase in the price of fuel would push the cost of production in the manufacturing industry up.

Also, cost of transportation would go up and even operators of Small, Medium Scale Enterprises would not be able to continue in business because most of them relied on generators to power their machines and generators are powered by fuel.

Some civil society organizations and organized labour are urging Nigerians to come out and protest subsidy removal. The question is, can Nigerians occupy the “Three Arm Zone” as Americans “Occupied” the “Street.”

Subsidy removal is turning out to be another Bretton Woods Institutions’ anti-peoples’ policy. It is a neo-liberal agenda developed by those in authority. It is not a popular idea but that of the ruling power. It is becoming a dominant idea because in every political setting, the dominant idea is the idea of the ruling power.

Now that the government is bent on removing subsidy from fuel against people’s outcry, the question to ask is if this is the “Fresh Air” that President Goodluck promised Nigerians during his campaigning?”

See also, see Ghana latest in Africa to cut fuel subsidies

Conscious Reggae Mix

Reggae is the default music for me. I love all kinds of genres but I always, always return to reggae (in all its forms). This is a mix I did in July 2011. Having listened to it endlessly in the gym, I thought I may as well post it online – the first time I’ve ever done so. It contains some of the finest conscious and lovers reggae tracks from the last few years. This mix is both mellow and uplifting, and features all kinds of artists from heavyweight veterans like Marcia Griffiths and Freddie McGregor to newer kids on block like I Octane, Taurus Riley and Romain Virgo. I haven’t put a tracklist, but can do if anyone’s interested.

Enjoy, and give feedback too, positive or negative – preferably positive 😉

Uganda Cranes Close to Ending 34 – Year Drought!

The Uganda Cranes defeated Guinea-Bissau 2 – 0 yesterday afternoon. The victory at Nambole stadium means the Cranes are now clear at the top of their qualifying group for next year’s African Cup of Nations (Afcon) tournament in Equatorial Guinea & Gabon. They have 3 wins and a draw from 4 matches, and have yet to concede a goal.

Amazingly, if the Cranes qualify for the Afcon finals, it will be their first appearance in 34 years! The last time they were there, they lost 0-2 in the final to the hosts Ghana. Since then, the Cranes have failed, largely because of a tyerrible record away from home. Although they have a terrific home record (last home loss was in 2005), their win over Guinea-Bissau earlier this year was their first away win in a decade.

The Cranes have two more games to go – a trip to Angola in September and Kenya at home in October. If Kenya and Angola draw in their match later today, then Uganda need only a point from their last two games to qualify. If Kenya win, then Uganda need one more win to be absolutely sure. [UPDATE: Angola 1 – 0 Kenya. This means a point in Luanda will see the Cranes through!]

A football-crazy nation awaits!

Uganda 2 – 0 Guinea Bissau – Goals

In the crowd!

1978 Afcon Final – Ghana 2 – 0 Uganda

R.I.P. Gill Scott Heron

Gil Scott Heron died in the week of African Liberation Day 2011. He was a genius and encountered some of the problems that usually come with genius. Along with others like the The Last Prophets, bother Gil provided the musical counterpart to the fiery politics of the 1960s and 1970s. And his music helped to inspire me to become politically-aware and to get involved in political activity. Here are some of my personal favourite songs of his.

Racism in Football? Ba!


West Ham were relegated from the Premier League after they did ‘an Arsenal’, and let a 2-0 half-time lead at Wigan turn into a 2-3 defeat.

I’m sad that West Ham have gone down. See, I’ve always had a lot of time for the Hammers. I grew up round the corner in Hackney and Leyton, and for years I worked 5 minutes from the Boleyn Ground. As an Arsenal fan, I love the fact that West Ham seem to really hate Tottenham. The hatred is so deep, that a few years back, they apparently allowed Arsenal agents to poison the Spurs players’ food so that they lost their last match of season against the Hammers, thus allowing Arsenal to qualify for the Champions League.

Today’s papers are full of stories of a how the brawl at West Ham’s recent end of season ball started after striker Demba Ba was racially abused by a West Ham fan. This incident reminded me of a part of West Ham’s history that I’m less excited about. Ask any African or Asian person over 30 years old, and they will tell you that during the seventies and eighties, West Ham was a club with some of the most racist supporters in England. Africans who played against West Ham in those days testify that playing at the Boleyn Ground was a horrible experience. They would face boos and monkey chants and would have bananas thrown at them by the locals.

Down the years, many Europeans have tried to play down this kind of abuse. They say that John Barnes being subjected to monkey chants is the same as Gordon Strachan being called a Ginger b*****d. These people think that racism is purely about appearance, and that Africans are only abused because we look different to Europeans. So we should get the ‘chip off our shoulders’ (what does this actually mean?) and stop moaning. But the abuse is just the tip of iceberg.

Behind every monkey chant is centuries of political, economic and military domination of Africans by Europe. The fans who made the monkey chants are signalling that they are proud that “Britons never, never, never” had been slaves – unlike Africans. The Liverpool supporter who threw a banana at the African footballer in his own team affirmed his belief that he is a member of a proud ‘superior race’ while the African is a part of an accursed race of slaves. When that European player called an African opponent a ‘mono’ (Spanish, for ‘monkey’) he sent a message to him that his people are nothing but poverty-stricken wretches and they should be thankful that Europeans came and ‘civilised’ them with slavery and colonialism.

Racist abuse is a reflection of the ideas of racial superiority. European Capitalists deliberately constructed these ideas to justify their brutal and relentless exploitation of Africa and Africans through Slavery and Colonialism. They fed these ideas to the European working class to foster racial solidarity and to help prevent revolutionary ideas. Having accepted these racist ideas, the European working classes happily enjoyed the fruits of Africa’s trampling (the cheap consumer goods, exotic food imports and high wages at the expense of African workers and labourers) and they also willingly fought in Imperialist wars to ‘pacify’ the Africans. And these ideas continue to be useful to this day, because Europe has never stopped dominating and exploiting Africa. This era is what is known as neo-colonialism. So, far-right groups like the BNP and more recently the EDL have grown in popularity, while mainstream parties take every opportunity to attack the terrifying threats of (non-European) immigration and multicuralism.

I’m really glad that racism in British football is far less of a problem than it was back in the day. Clubs like West Ham have successfully stamped out overt racist abuse in the grounds. They have also made great efforts to build links with their local communities which have high numbers of Africans and Asians.

But the fact that the incident at the West Ham party surfaced on the same day that two men go to trail for the murder of Stephen Lawrence shows that as long as racism has a function in society, it will persist in football.

Where is Uganda’s Lumumba?


In Uganda rampant inflation – coming shortly after a disputed election win for President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni – has given birth to the Walk to Work campaign. The Government response has been to shrug its shoulders and mete out obscene violence. This in turn has led to what looks like a surge in support for the main opposition figure, Kizza Besigye.

The government’s treatment of Besigye has placed him firmly in the media spotlight. And he is wasting no time in cultivating the idea that he is a popular leader who is fighting a despotic an increasingly unpopular and despotic Africa regime. Sounds familiar doesn’t it?

It remains to be seen whether Besigye is someone who can effectively unite Ugandans against Museveni. The fact is, his Forum for Democratic Change performed quite poorly in the Presidential election, though they reject these elections as fraudulent.

All of this has revived a question that has been bugging me for a while now… Where are the heroes of Ugandan independence?

My brothers and sisters from places like Ghana, Congo, Guinea-Bissau and Azania (South Africa) can all point to leaders who organised the people in successful anti-colonial resistance. These are the likes of ‘Osagyefo’ Kwame Nkrumah, Patrice Lumumba, Steve Biko, Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe, and Amilcar Cabral. These individuals are held in great regard because of the visionary leadership they provided to the independence movements. Of course, these individuals did not create themselves. Instead, they emerged from within political movements that prepared them to take positions of leadership. Without such movements, none of these men would have emerged.

But when I think of my home country Uganda, I can’t think of any such great leaders or any such movements. We seem to lack that history of popular anti-colonial resistance that so many other countries have. I might be wrong about this – in which case, I will greatly receive correction and enlightenment.

Maybe with the current crisis in our country, the time is ripe for such a movement to develop – and for “Uganda’s Lumumba” to emerge?

The Rise and Fall of So Solid: A Cautionary Tale


So Solid Nostalgia!

I’m feeling all nostalgic for the So Solid crew (pictured right). I’m thinking about the kind of things they might have gone on to achieve if their rise had not been stopped so soon.

So Solid emerged at the tail end of UK Garage’s commercial boom in the late 1990s. Up until then, MCs were not really recording artists. Instead, they hyped-up crowds in the clubs and rhymed over tracks on pirate radio stations. But So Solid and others ushered in a new era in which MCs took centre stage as artists in their own right.

On one hand, this was a positive development. MCs are able to express themselves a lot more comprehensively than singers and the new tracks provided a window into the things that black youth in London had on their minds. Unfortunately – but not surprisingly – these MCs mainly wanted to talk about sex, money and guns. The attitude they put forward was unashamedly materialistic, nihilistic and individualistic.

When they were up
This new era was led by the So Solid Crew along with others like Oxide and Neutrino, More Fire Crew and the Heartless Cru. So Solid led the way and in 2001, they achieved a series of chart hits from their debut album They Don’t Know. Their pinnacle was the massive chart-topper 21 Seconds with its superb video.

When they were down
But the bigger their profile became the more trouble they seemed to get into. The mainstream media fell over themselves to tell us about the latest brawl or stabbing or shooting that had occurred at a So Solid gig. At the same time, violence began to occur more and more frequently at UK Garage nights. Clubs began to disassociate themselves from Garage due to the violence.

Within months, So Solid went from chart topping superstars to public enemy number one, with even Government ministers lining up to blame them for the ills of urban Britain. So Solid were driven away from the limelight by the negative publicity and their sophomore album released in 2003 disappeared without much interest.

An alternative ending
Had So Solid been able to flourish and progress, they would have learned valuable lessons about the industry. They could then have passed these on to a younger generation. In fact, they had youngsters in their camp called So Solid Kids who were not actual members but were learning the ropes.

So Solid would inevitably have branched out into other commercial areas in order to generate new revenue streams. Imagine a large group of young black men and women becoming well-versed in business and entreprenuership and passing on that know-how to youngsters!

As they matured, So Solid might also have got more involved with their local community in constructive ways. For example, they could have supported anti-gun and knife crime initiatives and mentoring schemes.

Conscious lyrics
Over time, the group may have also grown up a bit lyrically and their music could have started to offer a more conscious worldview. In fact, last year So Solid’s Swiss released a track called Bad Boys (video below) which dealt with police harassment. Imagine if they had put out this kind of material during their heyday?

Lessons to learn
What can we do to prevent other youngsters falling into the So Solid trap? This question was answered by So Solid songstress Lisa Maffia in an interview last year:

“We had no guidance, no mentor,” says Maffia, “No one told us, ‘It’s probably not a good idea to stay on the estate where you grew up with all that money and success.’”

Our job as a community is to learn from the experience of So Solid and build relationships with up and coming artists to ensure that they are better prepared to handle fame and fortune if it comes their way.

Most African & Asian Children in the UK Living in Poverty


Once upon a time there was this horrible thing called “racism”. Racism used to affect dark-skinned people in the UK. It prevented us from being able to get jobs. We were called awful names and faced physical violence in the streets from racist people – including the police.

But thankfully, everything’s fine now because our society has grown up. Nowadays, there is no racism. We can prove this by looking at how many black people there are in the media. There are lots of black footballers and sports stars and we now have a record number of ‘ethnic’ MPs in the Commons. Racism is over.

So goes the myth.

The reality is that racism is alive and well. Perhaps some of the more blatant forms of abuse might not be as common as they were in the 70s and 80s. But people still face massive levels of inequality because of their cultural background.

A recent study shows that more than half of African (more commonly known as “African-Caribbean” or “black”) children in Britain live in poverty (i.e. 60 per cent of the average national household income). Even more disturbing, the study estimates a whopping 73 per cent of Pakistani and Bengali children are living in poverty. 73 per cent!

Statistics like these continue to underline the point that this system simply does not work for Africans and Asians. In fact, it doesn’t even work for most Europeans either. We need a radically different system – based on the social needs of the majority people rather than the thirst for profit of a few.